2017-11-08 / Front Page

Police Athletic League Lights On Afterschool Celebration Honors NYPD Officer

NYPD Officer Lamont Anderson is a former PAL kid who has been with the NYPD for 23 years and volunteering with PAL for seven years.NYPD Officer Lamont Anderson is a former PAL kid who has been with the NYPD for 23 years and volunteering with PAL for seven years.The Police Athletic League’s (PAL) Goldie Maple Beacon program joined on October 26 the 18th annual Lights On Afterschool rally, a nationwide series of rallies for afterschools organized by the Afterschool Alliance. During this event, activities that highlighted the achievements of afterschool students and drew attention to the need for more afterschool programs took place to help serve the millions of children nationwide who are unsupervised and at risk each weekday afternoon.

The Lights On Afterschool celebration recognized NYPD Officer Lamont Anderson and his contribution to the PAL Junior Police program. The PAL Junior Police program aspires to develop a productive relationship between the police and youth. Participants in the program exemplify PAL pride, respect, courage, sportsmanship, citizenship, and appreciation for the NYPD. Officer Anderson works with participants on drills, explains the career of a police officer, teaches life skills, and plans educational trips. Officer Anderson also takes time to speak with parents about opportunities the police department provides for youngsters, such as Explorers and Youth Police Academy.

NYPD Officer Lamont Anderson is a former PAL kid who has been with the NYPD for 23 years and volunteering with PAL for seven years. Officer Anderson understands the importance of police and kid interactions and that most officers enjoy working with kids. “This work is imperative because kids mainly see a negative perspective when watching the news and other outlets. Working with children in the community humanizes the police in their eyes.” When Anderson was a child, PAL staff and its NYPD volunteers influenced his educational and social development in a positive way. Today, he receives a sense of accomplishment when he is able to pay it forward. “Working hands-on, overtime, with PAL kids allows you to see their growth. It’s a rewarding feeling when you a see a timid child walk into your room the first day and watch him grow into an outspoken leader,” he said.

Last year, 1 million people participated in more than 8,000 Lights On Afterschool events. The event gave PAL youngsters a chance to showcase the skills they learn at afterschool programs and to recognize Anderson for his significant contributions to PAL. Elected and law enforcement officials, parents and students also witnessed the unveiling of a mural painted by Moving the Lives of Children, an artist highlighting PAL’s over 100-year tradition of bringing youth and police together.

New York City’s Police Athletic League is the first and finest civilian-run PAL in the country. Founded in 1914, PAL has served the city’s young people for 100 years. PAL provides recreational, educational, cultural and social activities to 35,000 boys and girls annually. It is also the city’s largest, independent, non-profit youth organization.  For more information, please visit www.palnyc.org.

 

 


Return to top

Copyright 1999-2017 The Service Advertising Group, Inc. All rights reserved.